God Didn’t Make You Do Anything

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Who You Are

 

Sometimes our identity becomes what we think or believe God “makes” us go through in life. Have you ever thought or told someone else that God is making you do something? Abraham sure did. Listen to his words to King Abimelech.

and it came about, when God caused me to wander from my father’s house… Genesis 20:13

 

Abraham had drifted out of the Promise Land, lied about his wife being his wife, and allowed Sarah to be taken into Abimelech’s household… now he had some explaining to do. In his explanation, Abraham accused and blamed God for his troubles. The truth was… God didn’t “make” him do anything … he chose to be obedient the day he left Ur for God’s promise. God didn’t make him “wander“.

When we go through stuff in life (stuff being difficulties, hardships, and trials) it is easy to blame God. The truth is, like Abraham, we also choose our obedience. Stuff always happens because the devil will be given the opportunity to test our words and obedience. Unless we are dead to self and our desires, it can become easy to fall back into old patterns and blame God.

This is one of the reasons God changed Abraham’s name. It is why God calls us by different names. If we do not know who we are, how are we going to convince anyone else we serve the Lord. Like Abraham, God is not making us do anything, we choose our obedience. Calling our obedience anything else is an insult.

We choose our obedience. In other words, we must own our spiritual decisions. Our identity is not what we believe God makes us do, but it’s found in knowing who we are in Him. We are who He says we are. God called Abraham a prophet and told him to pray for Abimelech and his family in this chapter. This is the first mention of the word “prophet” and “prayer” in the Bible. Abraham found out a lot about himself and his mission after he was confronted with his disobedience. We will find our purpose and destiny too – once we repent, choose obedience and find our identity in the Lord.

 

Blessings – From God’s Incubator,

Pastor

 

 

We must stand up for Middle East’s persecuted Christians

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My heart is broken as I see the continued persecution of believers around the world… especially those in the Middle East. Once again the various upheavals in Islamic countries have provided cover for certain agencies to persecute God’s people… Christians. It is a sad day when Muslims are more concerned for the lives of Christians and believers in the West!

I am reposting an editorial post on FoxNews.com.  It is by Johnnie Moore, who is encouraging believers in the West to stand-up for Christians under persecution in the Middle East. Take some time to read it and ask the Lord what He would have you to do.

Blessings,

Pastor

 

_________________________

 

Christianity began in the East, not the West, yet today Christians in the East are enduring an all-out-assault by Islamic terrorists, while Christians in the West live their lives largely oblivious to it all. This has to change.

This is no imaginary persecution; in Syria alone there have been reports of kidnappings, Christian communities intentionally displaced by militants and, worst of all, shootings and beheadings of Christians who refused to convert to Islam.

In Egypt radicals have recently destroyed dozens of churches, and the once vibrant Christian population in Iraq has been decimated.

Christians in the West should stand up for those in the East out of regard for all they have given us over these thousands of years, if for no other reason.

See, what most American Christians don’t realize is that the “Islamic World” was once the Christian world. Some of the most well-known and influential leaders in the early church hailed from North Africa and the Middle East – like the warring theologians Athanasius and Arius, and the apologist Tertullian.  It was for the library in Alexandria that the preeminent Greek version of the Torah (the “Septuagint”) was commissioned.

Today, St. Augustine would be called a Tunisian, Origen would be Egyptian and the Apostle Paul – who was on the road to Damascus when he encountered Christ – would have told the story of his conversion while heading to “Syria.”

It was also in the Syrian city of “Antioch” that Christians were first called “Christians,” and to this day there are as many Christian holy sites in that nation as anywhere else in the world.

When Jesus was born, and his life was threatened by the hysteria of King Herod, it was to Egypt that Joseph and Mary fled until Herod’s bloodlust subsided.

If the famed Council of Nicaea were held today, the headline would read: “Christian theologians gather in Turkey to settle long-held dispute about Christ’s deity,” and the part of the Jordan River where Jesus was baptized could have very well flowed through modern-day Jordan , as opposed to Israel.

Christianity was once so entrenched in the modern Islamic world that for centuries the center for Christian scholarship was Baghdad, and the long-ruined city of Merv (not far from border of what is now Afghanistan) was not only the largest city of its time, it was also best known as the center of Bible translation.

To this day – in nearly all of those places – there are Christian communities that have persevered through the ages, but now face the threat of extinction.

They have endured conflict after conflict, schism after schism, and they have learned how to coexist with peace-loving Muslims who are themselves fighting against the same radicalism that has caused the burning and bombing of hundreds of churches around the Islamic world since the spark of Arab Spring.

The trickling stream of Christianity runs in these places all the way to the era of Christ himself, but now – particularly in Syria – that stream is being dried up more quickly that most people realize.

Sadly, few Christians in the West have any idea this is going on, and I was once just like them.

Then I was invited last September to observe a meeting convened by Jordan’s King Abdullah in his country’s capital, Amman. Several dozen leaders of the Christian congregations of the East attended the meeting; I listened as these Catholic cardinals, Orthodox patriarchs and Anglican and Coptic bishops described the plight of their people.

No one was discussing their theological differences, because it was their churches that had been burned, their relatives who had been kidnapped and killed, and nearly every one of them told stories of consoling an inconsolable mother or child as they grieved the death of their last living loved one.

I wept as I heard their stories, and I wondered why Christians around the world weren’t incensed by it all.

Ironically, that meeting in Jordan was not convened by Christians, but by Muslims who cared about the plight of their Christian neighbors. 

At one point, Jordan’s strong and kind king said that “it is a duty rather than a favor” to protect the Christians in the region, and Prince Ghazi bin Muhammad, a senior adviser to the king, acknowledged that “Christians were in this region before Muslims.” He said, “They are not strangers, nor colonialists, nor foreigners. They are natives of these lands and Arabs, just as Muslims are.”

While I was deeply encouraged by the tone of these Islamic leaders, I couldn’t help but ask myself, “I wonder how many Christians in the West even care about those in the East?”

In that moment, I decided I would be their advocate.

It was the Apostle Paul who once advised some friends in Greece to “pray that we may be delivered from wicked and evil people.”

I hear Paul’s prayer again on the lips of those persecuted today, and I call upon Christians everywhere to pray for and be an advocate for those upon whose foundation so much of our faith has been built.

Indeed, it isn’t a favor. It’s our duty.

 ________

Johnnie Moore is the author of a new book about Jesus called Dirty God (#DirtyGod). He is a Professor of Religion and Vice President of Liberty University, where he, among other things, supervises its Center for Global Engagement. Keep up with him on Twitter (@JohnnieM) or at Facebook.com/JohnnieOnline. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Johnnie Moore.

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